Lawmen and Plowmen

From my review of Stephen M. Yeager, From Lawmen to Plowmen: Anglo-Saxon Legal Tradition and the School of Langland (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014):

What did Old English literature contribute to the literary cultures of post-Conquest England? The question has attracted renewed attention in recent years. Manuscript scholars note that Old English prose continued to be read and copied long after the Conquest. Metrists discern lines of continuity between pre- and post-Conquest verse forms. Stephen M. Yeager’s new book, From Lawmen to Plowmen: Anglo-Saxon Legal Tradition and the School of Langland (2014), is a timely addition to this research area. The focus here is neither book production per se, nor versification (both remain relevant). Instead, this study is situated at the level of the discursive formation: Yeager aims to trace an “Anglo-Saxon legal-homiletic discourse” from the writings of Wulfstan forward to the “school of Langland.”

[The review will be published in Medium Aevum]

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